The Top 10 Most Popular Searches On Google In 2014

Each year, Google releases a list of the topics we’ve collectively searched for the most over the past 12 months.

Google released two lists this year — one for US search trends, and one for worldwide search trends. The lists are mostly the same, with just a few differences.

US Trending Searches:

  1. Robin Williams
  2. World Cup
  3. Ebola
  4. Malaysia Airlines
  5. Flappy Bird
  6. ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
  7. ISIS
  8. Ferguson
  9. Frozen
  10. Ukraine

Global Trending Searches:

  1. Robin Williams
  2. World Cup
  3. Ebola
  4. Malaysia Airlines
  5. ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
  6. Flappy Bird
  7. Conchita Wurst
  8. ISIS
  9. Frozen
  10. Sochi Olympics

The two lists are strikingly similar, save for the global list leaning toward Conchita Wurst and the Sochi Olympics in place of Ferguson and Ukraine.

Interesting to note: this is the first year in a few where an Apple product didn’t make the cut. (2010 had iPad; 2011 featured both iPhone 5 and iPad 3; 2012 had iPad 3 again; 2013 had the iPhone 5S in spot #2)

Also of note: as far as I can recall, Flappy Bird is the first mobile app to crack Google’s top 10. Having a wildly successful app is one thing — but an app that becomes one of the most searched for things around the entire world? Achievement unlocked. (Google notes that 2048 and Flappy Bird, both one-man projects, beat out Destiny, the most expensive game ever developed.)

Read the original article here

Recently Published Issue in the Journal Current Gene Therapy

Current Gene Therapy is a bi-monthly peer-reviewed journal aimed at academic and industrial scientists with an interest in major topics concerning basic research and clinical applications of gene and cell therapy of genetic diseases. Cell therapy manuscripts can also include application in non-genetic diseases when cells have been genetically modified. Current Gene Therapy publishes reviews and original research on the latest developments in gene transfer and gene expression analysis, vector development, cellular genetic engineering, animal models and human clinical applications of gene and cell therapy for the treatment of genetic diseases.

Following are the articles from the journal Current Gene Therapy, 15 Issue 01:

Article: Effects of APC De-Targeting and GAr Modification on the Duration of Luciferase Expression from Plasmid DNA Delivered to Skeletal Muscle

Author(s): Maria C. Subang, Rewas Fatah, Ying Wu, Drew Hannaman, Jason Rice, Claire F. Evans, Yuti Chernajovsky and David Gould

 

Article: MicroRNAs: Association with Radioresistant and Potential Uses of Natural Remedies as Green Gene Therapeutic Approaches

Author(s): Subramanion L. Jothy, Yeng Chen, Soundararajan Vijayarathna, Jagat R. Kanwar and Sreenivasan Sasidharan

 

Article: Transfection of CXCR-4 Using Microbubble-Mediated Ultrasound Irradiation and Liposomes Improves the Migratory Ability of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

Author(s): Gong Wang, Zhongxiong Zhuo, Qian Zhang, Yali Xu, Shengzheng Wu, Lu Li, Hongmei Xia and Yunhua Gao

 

Article: Controlled Gene Delivery Can Enhance Therapeutic Outcome for Cancer Immune Therapy for Melanoma

Author(s): Shawna A. Shirley, Cathryn G. Lundberg, Fanying Li, Niculina Burcus and Richard Heller

 

Article: Safety and Efficacy of Tumor-Targeted Interleukin 12 Gene Therapy in Treated and Non-Treated, Metastatic Lesions

Author(s): Jeffry Cutrera, Glenn King, Pamela Jones, Kristin Kicenuik, Elias Gumpel, Xueqing Xia and Shulin Li

 

Article: Microfluidic Methods for Non-Viral Gene Delivery

Author(s): Wing-Fu Lai

 

Article: Preclinical Evaluation of Efficacy and Safety of an Improved Lentiviral Vector for the Treatment of β-Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Disease

Author(s): Olivier Negre, Cynthia Bartholomae, Yves Beuzard, Marina Cavazzana, Lauryn Christiansen, Celine Courne, Annette Deichmann, Maria Denaro, Edouard de Dreuzy, Mitchell Finer, Raffaele Fronza, Beatrix Gillet-Legrand, Christophe Joubert, Robert Kutner, Philippe Leboulch, Leila Maouche, Anais Paulard, Francis J. Pierciey, Michael Rothe, Byoung Ryu, Manfred Schmidt, Christof von Kalle, Emmanuel Payen and Gabor Veres

 

Article: The Potential of the Human Osteopontin Promoter and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms for Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

Author(s): X.G. Chen and W.T. Godbey

For details, please visit: http://bit.ly/1uYi5eL

 

2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 30,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 11 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Bentham Open Access Article

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The article entitled “Antihypertensive Drugs Metabolism: An Update to Pharmacokinetic Profiles and Computational Approaches” in the journal Current Pharmaceutical Design, 2015, 21, 806-822, is now open for all to view and access.

Download the complete article here: http://bit.ly/1EAwU0S
For journal information, please visit: http://bit.ly/1xtrce3

5 Digital Health Trends You’ll See In 2015

Medical-Technology-Apps-thumb2014 has been a huge year for health tech. According to digital health incubator StartUp Health, digital health funding in the first three quarters of 2014 has already surpassed $5 billion, close to double what was invested in all of 2013 ($2.8 billion).

With this kind of capital pouring into the market, the health tech space should be exciting to watch in the coming years, but here’s a sneak peek at what’s coming in 2015.

  1.   Wearables For The Ear

Tired of clip-on trackers and bracelets? Your next wearable device just might be hooked around your ear.

We’ve already seen a few of companies introduce ear buds with basic health monitoring, such as IriverOn and FreeWavz. Watch for increasing sophistication in ear-based devices over the coming year.

For example, Sensogram’s SensoTRACK — slated for general availability in March 2015 — is an elegantly designed device that fits snugly on your ear, where it measures heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation and respiration rate. It also counts steps and calories burned, while sensing your speed, activity level, geolocation, altitude, body posture and pace.

Also keep an eye out for BitBite, the first ear-based device that automatically tracks your eating habits and helps you improve them with real-time dietary advice. The BitBite device fits comfortably in your ear and learns when, where and how you eat. It then analyzes this data and gently nudges you to make adjustments, such as slowing down your eating pace or drinking more water. BitBite doles out its advice either by “whispering” in your ear or by alerting you through the BitBite smartphone app.

BitBite just launched its Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign on November 11, with general availability expected in Q2 of 2015.

  1. Sweat Sensor Strips

Want even more insight into what’s going on in your body? You’ll soon be able to track your internal biochemistry with a simple biosensor strip.

Electrozyme is developing a printed, flexible strip sensor that inserts into the back of your wearable device and measures the metabolic substances secreted in your sweat, allowing you to track your electrolyte balance, hydration level, muscle exertion and physical performance. According to Electrozyme, the chemical analysis enabled by its disposable biosensors can give people actual insights into their metabolism that go way beyond steps and heart rate.

Tangney sees a range of different applications for this technology, including letting you know when it’s time to drink some water — something most of us probably need: according to some reports, up to 75% of Americans may be chronically dehydrated.

  1. Smartphone Case Devices

You’re already carrying around a smartphone with a protective case. Why shouldn’t it do double-duty as a medical device?

“We’re starting to see some initial forays into using smartphones and their cases to measure medical conditions that previously required specialized equipment,” says Joanne Rohde, CEO and founder of Axial Exchange. “Imagine an electrocardiogram anywhere — not just at your doctor’s office — or a DIY blood test to check your glucose right in your pocket. Some of these innovations are already available, but there are many more to come.”

One of the first to hit the market was the AliveCor heart monitor, an FDA-approved iPhone case that allows you to record ECGs and heart rate on the go. You can rest it on your fingers or chest to record an ECG in 30 seconds, and know right away if atrial fibrillation is detected, which could be an early indicator of stroke.

In 2015, watch for more such devices to become available as they pass through the FDA approval process.

For example, Azoi’s Wello is a mobile health tracking device which doubles as an iPhone case and is currently in the process of getting FDA approval. It can measure vitals such as ECG, heart rate, blood oxygen saturation levels, respiration and temperature.

  1. Prescription-Only Apps

There are already thousands of health apps you can find on Google Play or iTunes. Soon, some of these apps may require a prescription.

One early example is WellDoc’s BlueStar, the first “Mobile Prescription Therapy” for people living with type 2 diabetes. The prescription-only app allows people to input data about their glucose levels, diet, exercise, well-being and other factors, which BlueStar automatically analyzes to give the patient immediate guidance and feedback. BlueStar also analyzes the data for the patient’s physician and allows the patient to provide a detailed summary of their progress to the physician for review prior to or during office visits.

While you might not see a flood of prescription-only apps hit the app store in January — launching one requires FDA approval, clinical trials, insurance reimbursement and more — WellDoc’s co-founder and chief medical officer Dr. Suzanne Sysko Clough says we should “expect to see more Mobile Prescription Therapies for many major chronic diseases over the coming years.”

  1. Healthier Lighting

Finally, ever wonder why you have trouble drifting off after staring at your iPad in bed? The culprit may be the blue light emitted from your device — the part of the light spectrum that causes the biggest changes to your internal circadian rhythm, which can disrupt your sleep and impact your health.

“People who don’t get enough sleep have trouble being productive, controlling their emotions and coping with change. They’re also at greater risk of major health issues such as heart disease, diabetes and stroke,” says Cameron Postelwait of Sewell Development Corporation, developer of the low-blue-light Drift light bulb, which launched in May of this year.

Postelwait believes that in 2015, we’ll see a much bigger focus on the effects that artificial light has on people’s health, as well as new product innovations to address the problem, particularly in clinical environments and hospitals.

“A patient in unstable condition requires nurse visits all through the night. Every time the nurse enters the room, he activates some kind of lighting to help him check on the patient’s condition and to give medication. This throws off the patient’s natural circadian rhythm, which not only disturbs sleep, but may also impact immune response,” explains Postelwait. “There’s a huge need for lighting that either has an absence of blue light or a way to change the amount of blue light that the patient receives during the day or night.”

But while too much bright light might be harmful at night, too little during the day can also bring you down.

But while too much bright light might be harmful at night, too little during the day can also bring you down. Luckily, there are folks hard at work to add some sunshine to your day.

For example, GoodLux Technology recently launched SunSprite, the first wearable device to track daily bright light intake. According to GoodLux, scientific studies have linked bright light exposure to health benefits such as better energy, mood and sleep.

“There’s so much focus on nutrition and fitness that mental wellness is often overlooked. Bright light sets the body’s internal clock, which controls essential components of mental wellness: hormones, energy levels, mood, digestion and sleep,” says GoodLux CEO Ed Likovich. “Three out of four of our early adopters report improvements in these essential components to mental wellness.”

The solar-powered SunSprite boasts dual sensors that measure visible and UV light and lets users know when they’ve absorbed just the right amount of bright light to maintain health, while also providing tracking for monitoring UV exposure.

Read the original article at Mashable

Highlighted Article of the Journal Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

10365783_797877666945314_937599939536861704_nFor more information, click here: Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

Bentham Open Access Article

images
The article, “Sodium-Assisted Formation of Binding and Traverse Conformations of the Substrate in a Neurotransmitter Sodium Symporter Model” in the journal Current Drug Discovery Technologies, 2014, 11, 227-233, is now open for all to view and access.
Download the complete article here: http://bit.ly/1EAjl1m
For journal information, please visit: http://bit.ly/1wWJXVv

Bentham Science Free 3 Month Trial Is Active in HSC Library

free trial

Health Sciences Center Library Administration (HSCLA)

HSCLA Kuwait University: The Health Sciences Center Library provides patrons with electronic resources,user-friendly services & the latest medical information.

For more details, visit their website: http://horizon.hsc.edu.kw/library

Essential Journals on Drug Discovery

Ad drug discoveryClick on the journal name to access the complete list of articles:

Current Analytical Chemistry (http://bit.ly/1vCwoWG)
Current Drug Delivery (http://bit.ly/1D2cVDH)

Browse journals by subject here: http://bit.ly/1oNS4Sa

 

Recently Published Issue of The Journal: Current Pharmaceutical Analysis

Current Pharmaceutical Analysis publishes expert reviews and original research articles on all the most recent advances in pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis. All aspects of the field are represented including drug analysis, analytical methodology and instrumentation. The journal is essential to all involved in pharmaceutical, biochemical and clinical analysis.

Following are the articles recently published in the journal Current Pharmaceutical Analysis, 11 Issue 01:

Article: The Site-specific Protonation Constants of Spectinomycin, Characterized by 1H and 15N NMR Methods  

Author(s): Mate Somlyay, Gabor Orgovan and Bela Noszal

Article: Application of Droplet Size Analysis for the Determination of the Required HLB of Lemon Oil in O/W Emulsion

Author(s): N.A. Niczinger, N. Kallai-Szabo, J. Dredan, L. Budai, M. Hajdu and I. Antal

 

Article: Electrochemical Analysis of Cyanuric Acid Using Polyaniline/CuGeO3 Nanowires as Electrode Modified Materials

Author(s): L.Z. Pei, H.D. Liu, N. Lin, Y.K. Xie and Z.Y. Cai

 

Article: Simultaneous Analysis of Losartan Potassium and its Related Impurities and Degradation Products in Tablets Using HPLC

Author(s): Shuhong Qiu, Kai Liu, Panqin Ma, Menglin Wang, Hongming Chen, Xiaochao Xu, Xiaoli Hao and Yongjun Wang

Article: LC-MS/MS Assay for Quantification of a Novel Antitubercular Molecule S006-830: Pharmacokinetic and Plasma Protein Binding Studies in Rats

Author(s): Mahendra Kumar Hidau, Yeshwant Singh, Sudhir Shahi, Poojari Mounika and Shio Kumar Singh

 

Article: Method Development & Validation of LCMS/MS for Atorvastatin and Olmesartan in Human Plasma to Trace Drug Interaction of Formulation          

Author(s): Rakesh Das and T.K. Pal

 

Article: The Effect of Albumin-genotype on Ibuprofen Displacement of Nifedipine from its Binding Sites.

Author(s): Eman Atef and Ahmed S. Mehanna

 

Article: High Sensitivity C-reactive Protein and Cardiovascular Risk Prediction

Author(s): Andreja Trpkovic, Julijana Stanimirovic, Ivana Resanovic, Petar Otasevic, Danimir Jevremovic, Radak Djordje and Esma R. Isenovic

 

Article: Analysis of Tocopherols and Tocotrienols in Pharmaceuticals and Foods: A Critical Review

Author(s): Dan Lu, Yi Yang, Yongxin Li and Chengjun Sun

For details, please visit: http://bit.ly/1BjtM3A