Most Accessed Articles – “Recent Updates on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor δ Agonists for the Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome”

Journal: Medicinal Chemistry

mcAbstract: Metabolic syndrome is a disorder described by reduced insulin sensitivity, overweight, hyperlipidaemia, high blood pressure and myocardial disorders, mainly due to high fat diet and lack of physical activity. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are type II nuclear hormone receptors that regulate a number of processes in living systems, such as metabolism of carbohydrates and fatty acids, growth and differentiation of cell, and inflammatory reactions. Alpha, gamma and delta are the three distinct isoforms of PPAR. The stimulation of PPARδ alters body’s energy fuel preference from glucose to fat. The PPARδ isoform is expressed ubiquitously in all tissues, especially in those tissues which involved in metabolism of lipids like adipose tissue, liver, kidney, and muscle. Currently, PPARδ is an emerging therapeutic target for the pharmacological therapy of disorders associated with metabolic syndrome. Several PPARδ selective agonists had been reported in last ten years, many of them had been advanced into the late phase of clinical trials such as Endurobol (GW501516). However, no PPARδ agonists are yet approved for human use. The present work had been planned to cover wide variety of PPARδ agonists reported till now along with their potential role to tackle various metabolic disorders. The present review has been planned to focus mainly the most popular PPARδ agonists.

Read more here: http://benthamscience.com/journals/medicinal-chemistry/volume/12/issue/1/page/3/

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