The Deadly Chain – ADHD to Substance Abuse to Suicide or Homicide!

This millennium is pretty dangerously marked with events where people have either taken their own lives or lives of others around them for apparently no significant reason. When we say ‘apparently no significant reason’ it does not mean that there wasn’t any trigger whatsoever for such events. When psychiatrists went out to study what was going wrong with certain people, they came across a number of problems related to psyche, behavior and mental health. One problem greatly found in vogue is Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or ADHD. People with ADHD, as we know, can experience serious issues with attention and impulsivity. They are far more likely to succumb to other problems like substance and drug abuse.

drug-addiction

Psychiatrists realize that Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders (SRAD) is often the next step for ADHD patients. They are looking for ways that can satiate their urge for suppressing their mental problem and fall victim to substance abuse. Different drugs and substances have different effects on their already vulnerable brains. They can find their depression, anxiety and social problems further aggravated. Substance abusers are badly disconnected with the society and environment. This means they are falling further into the dark abyss of psychosis.

Worst of all stages can be when these ADHD substance abusers begin to detest the life itself. Suicidal or homicidal tendencies erupt inside them and they go out taking the most feared steps. They either take their own lives or of other people who they find as easy targets. Thus, this deadly chain culminates in the death of somebody, which is horrific to say the least.

This dire research is covered in the research article, “Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders as a Risk Factor of Suicide and Homicide among Patients with ADHD: A Mini Review, by Dr. Kouichi Yoshimasu from Wakayama Medical University, Japan.

You can read this and many more researches on the topic in the journal Current Drug Abuse Reviews.

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