Investigation of the Mechanism of Protein Denaturation by Guanidine Hydrochloride-Induced Dissociation of Inhibitor-Protease Complexes

This is a podcast from one of our authors, Dr. Mohammad A Qasim, who contributed an article, “Investigation of the Mechanism of Protein Denaturation by Guanidine Hydrochloride-Induced Dissociation of Inhibitor-Protease Complexes” in our journal, Protein & Peptide Letters. Please watch and share!

 

Bentham High Impact Factor Journals – Most Cited Articles

Bentham Science Most Cited Articles
Most Cited Articles

Current Gene Therapy

Impact Factor 5.318

Electroporation Gene Therapy Preclinical and Clinical Trials for Melanoma

Zinc-Finger Nuclease Based Genome Surgery: It’s All About Specificity

Potential Cancer Gene Therapy by Baculoviral Transduction

Current Drug Metabolism

Impact Factor 4.405

 Graphic Rule for Drug Metabolism Systems

Review of MARCH-INSIDE & Complex Networks Prediction of Drugs: ADMET, Anti-parasite Activity, Metabolizing Enzymes and Cardiotoxicity Proteome Biomarkers

Current Molecular Medicine 

Impact Factor 4.197

Immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells: Advances and applications

αA- and αB-Crystallins Interact with Caspase-3 and Bax to Guard Mouse Lens Development

Nitric Oxide and Cancer: The Emerging Role of S-Nitrosylation

Current Medicinal Chemistry

Impact Factor 4.07

Curcumin as an Anti-Cancer Agent: Review of the Gap Between Basic and Clinical Applications

Clinical Uses of Melatonin: Evaluation of Human Trials

Coumarins: Old Compounds with Novel Promising Therapeutic Perspectives

Current Cancer Drug Targets

Impact Factor 4

The mTOR Pathway: A New Target in Cancer Therapy

Dexamethasone Synergizes with Lenalidomide to Inhibit Multiple Myeloma Tumor Growth, But Reduces Lenalidomide-Induced Immunomodulation of T and NK Cell Function

Bortezomib as the First Proteasome Inhibitor Anticancer Drug: Current Status and Future Perspectives

Current Gene Therapy

Impact Factor 5.318

Electroporation Gene Therapy Preclinical and Clinical Trials for Melanoma

Zinc-Finger Nuclease Based Genome Surgery: It’s All About Specificity

Potential Cancer Gene Therapy by Baculoviral Transduction  

Current Drug Metabolism

Impact Factor 4.405

 Graphic Rule for Drug Metabolism Systems

Review of MARCH-INSIDE & Complex Networks Prediction of Drugs: ADMET, Anti-parasite Activity, Metabolizing Enzymes and Cardiotoxicity Proteome Biomarkers

Current Molecular Medicine 

Impact Factor 4.197

Immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells: Advances and applications

αA- and αB-Crystallins Interact with Caspase-3 and Bax to Guard Mouse Lens Development

Nitric Oxide and Cancer: The Emerging Role of S-Nitrosylation

Current Medicinal Chemistry

Impact Factor 4.07

Curcumin as an Anti-Cancer Agent: Review of the Gap Between Basic and Clinical Applications

Clinical Uses of Melatonin: Evaluation of Human Trials

Coumarins: Old Compounds with Novel Promising Therapeutic Perspectives

Current Cancer Drug Targets

Impact Factor 4

The mTOR Pathway: A New Target in Cancer Therapy

Dexamethasone Synergizes with Lenalidomide to Inhibit Multiple Myeloma Tumor Growth, But Reduces Lenalidomide-Induced Immunomodulation of T and NK Cell Function

Bortezomib as the First Proteasome Inhibitor Anticancer Drug: Current Status and Future Perspectives

http://www.benthamscience.com

Some Amazing Inventions in the World

Carpet Alarm Clock

Get out of bed. Awakening has never been as simple as it is with this alarm clock. To turn it off, you need to actually wake up and step
on the carpet. Designed by Sofie Collin and Gustav Lanberg, it’s still only a concept design and not yet available for purchase.

 

Pills-To-Go

Designed by Pristman Good, it aims to help those who often need to take pills but don’t have a glass of water handy to wash them down. A little package can hold an aspirin and water together. How come pharm companies haven’t caught on to this invention yet?

Butter Stick

Why use a knife for butter when you can use a butter stick? This “device” from Japan would be a good addition to any kitchen.

Bike Jacket With Turn Signals

If you like to ride your bike at night, you definitely
understand the importance of visibility. With this jacket, which has LED lights and wrist-mounted switches for control, you can add a bit of safety to your speed.

 

Fruit Sweaters

You read it right. These hand-made sweaters are made for fruits, to warm them up quickly after taking them out of the fridge. Just imagine – you grab a peach from your fridge, put some clothes on it, and once it’s warmed up, eat it with pleasure! It’s a real way out for those who have very sensitive teeth.

Staircase Drawers

The area underneath the stairs is perfectly usable. Staircase drawers are an absolutely brilliant idea for those who are looking for space-saving tricks. Who would have thought that such small places could have so much space inside!

borrowed from http://news.nster.com

Fresh from Our Press!

Check out our latest eBooks on http://benthamscience.com:

Fundamental Problems in Quantum Field Theory

Advances in Combinatorial Chemistry & High Throughput Screening,  Vol. 1

Traditional Window Designs of Kirklareli, Turkey

Applicative Chemistry of Tanning Metallic

Opportunities and Limitations for Biotechnology Innovation in Brazil

Thyroid cancer: A Clinical Overview and A Useful Laboratory Manual

From the World of Bentham eBooks
From the World of Bentham eBooks

Frontiers in Drug Discovery: Erythropoietic Stimulating Agents

Switching Mode Circuit Analysis and Design: Innovative Methodology by Novel Solitary Electromagnetic Wave Theory

Inside Health Care: Neonatal Intensive Care – Who Decides? Who Pays? Who Can Afford it?

Inside the New University: Prerequisites for a Contemporary Knowledge Production

…… and many more!

From the World of Bentham Science Publishers


SUBSCRIPTION BASED JOURNALS 

Current Molecular Medicine 
Current Genomics 
Current Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine
Current Protein & Peptide Science
Current Proteomics
Reviews on Recent Clinical Trials
Current Drug Delivery
Drug Delivery Letters
Recent Patents on Regenerative Medicine
Recent Patents on Drug Delivery & Formulation
Current Stem Cell Research
Protein and Peptide Letters

BENTHAM OPEN JOURNALS

Current Chemical Genomics
The Open Clinical Trials Journal
The Open Gene Therapy Journal
The Open Genomics Journal
The Open Proteomics Journal

For more titles and fields, please visit http://benthamscience.com.

Publishers of Quality Research
From the World of Bentham Science Publishers

 

 

Fish Oil has Beneficial Effects on Behavior Impairment and Oxidative Stress in Rats Subjected to a Hepatic Encephalopathy Model

Watch this outstanding podcast based on the article “Fish Oil has Beneficial Effects on Behavior Impairment and Oxidative Stress in Rats Subjected to a Hepatic Encephalopathy Model” by Dr. Anete C.Ferraz published in our journal CNS & Neurological Disorders – Drug Targets.

“TRP Channels: New Potential Therapeutic Approaches in CNS Neuropathies”

One of our esteemed authors, Dr Massimo Nabissi, shared this podcast with us based on his article “TRP Channels: New Potential Therapeutic Approaches in CNS Neuropathies” in our journal, CNS & Neurological Disorders – Drug Targets. I am sure you will like it.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=493748537384114&saved

Amazing Science News

Milky Way’s black hole pulling in gas cloud

The destruction is only beginning

By Andrew Grant 

Milky Way's black hole pulling in gas cloud
Milky Way’s black hole pulling in gas cloud

An ill-fated gas cloud has begun a close encounter with the monstrous black hole at the center of the Milky Way, a fresh set of observations reveals. Astronomers don’t expect the cloud to emerge intact, resulting in an unprecedented view of our galaxy’s largest black hole feasting on its prey.

In December 2011, astronomers identified the gas cloud, called G2, and found that its orbit would bring it perilously close to the Milky Way’s central black hole by mid-2013. Nineteen months ago, the immense gravity of the black hole, which weighs in at about 4.3 million times the mass of the sun, was already squeezing and stretching the gas cloud as if it were pasta dough.

Now images captured in April with the Very Large Telescope in Chile show that the leading edge of G2 has whipped around the black hole’s far side. “The line of sight is such that the gas cloud is falling away from us toward the black hole,” says Stefan Gillessen of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching, Germany. “Some material swung by the back side of the black hole and is now flying toward us.”

“If you think of the cloud as a roller coaster train, the first carriage has already swung by the black hole,” Gillessen says. “The main part of the train is still in approach.”

The gas cloud is whizzing through space at up to 3,000 kilometers per second, 100 times the speed at which Earth orbits the sun and a whopping 1 percent of the speed of light. In just a few months, the black hole has not only accelerated the cloud to those speeds, but reversed the motion of the front side a full 180 degrees. The findings will appear in an upcomingAstrophysical Journal.

Gillessen and his team also found that the black hole has stretched G2 to twice its length last year. As a result, the researchers predict that the bulk of the cloud won’t make its closest approach to the black hole until early next year. When that happens, telescopes around the world will point at the galactic center to capture the drama.

Dimitrios Giannios, an astrophysicist at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind., does not expect G2 to survive its encounter with the galaxy’s central black hole.  The cloud will probably fade from view in coming months as it continues to stretch out, he says. But its remnants might gradually get funneled into the black hole within a few decades, culminating in a rare bright display as they approach the point of no return. “It would be a last echo of the death of this cloud,” he says.

 

Size isn’t only mystery of huge virus

Strange replication method and unusual genetic sequence among the mysteries

By Cristy Gelling

Size isn't only mystery of huge virus
Size isn’t only mystery of huge virus

The largest virus ever identified has been found on the seafloor off the coast of Chile.Pandoravirus salinus is about twice as long as the previous record holder, Megavirus chilensis, with a genome that is twice as large. That makes P. salinus larger than the smallest bacteria.

Beyond its impressive size, the Pandoravirus is strange in some other ways. Rather than reproducing by first making a viral coat and then filling it in or by building its coat around genetic material, P. salinus builds its insides and outsides simultaneously, starting at one end of the horseshoe-shaped viral particle and finishing at the other. What’s more, only 7 percent of the virus’s genes match any known gene sequences, researchers report in the July 19 Science.

The authors suggest a controversial hypothesis for why the Pandoravirus is so odd: It could have evolved from a type of free-living, ancient cell that no longer exists. Its discovery is likely to add fuel to the heated debate about the evolutionary origins of viruses.

 

Stem cells made with just seven chemicals

Cocktail of molecules turns adult mouse cells into embryonic-like ones

By Meghan Rosen

Stem cells made with just seven chemicals
Stem cells made with just seven chemicals

Whipping up a batch of stem cells just got easier.

A new recipe for transforming adult cells into embryonic-like ones calls for a chemical cocktail to erase signs of age. By adding just seven small molecules, scientists can turn back time for mature mouse cells, converting them into pluripotent stem cells. These cells hover at the brink of developing into virtually any type of tissue.

Researchers have previously created pluripotent stem cells using cloning, or by dosing a dish of adult cells with “master genes” that flip grown-up cells back to a youthful state. But cloning cells and tinkering with genes can be expensive and technically tricky.

So biologist Pingping Hou of Peking University in Beijing and colleagues scoured a collection of about 10,000 chemicals and found a combination that mimicked the cell-programming effects of master genes. Adding the combo to adult mouse cells turned them into pluripotent stem cells, which the researchers could then make into brain, lung or muscle tissue, Hou and colleagues report July 18 in Science.

If the chemical method works in human cells, it could one day make stem cells for medical use, the researchers suggest.

 

Mars meteorite reveals its age

Long difficult to estimate, date of space rocks’ formation emerges with new technique

By Andrew Grant 

Mars meteorite reveals its age
Mars meteorite reveals its age

Providing a tool for unlocking secrets of the early solar system, a new technique accurately determines the age of meteorites, scientists report in the July 25 Nature.

Scientists disagree over estimates of meteorites’ ages because it’s hard to distinguish between when the rocks formed and when they got seared from an impact and flung into space toward Earth.

UCLA geochronologist Axel Schmitt and colleagues began by examining the structure of a meteorite’s mineral crystals, which differs depending on whether the crystals solidified gradually within a lava flow or rapidly after the intense heat and pressure of an impact. Then they determined the age of the crystals by measuring the ratio of uranium to lead. Uranium has two isotopes, each of which decays into its own lead isotope, providing researchers with multiple radioactive-dating measurements to cross-check for consistency.

The team analyzed the Martian meteorite Northwest Africa 5298 and found large, interlocking crystals about 187 million years old, which suggests that the rock formed during a volcanic eruption back then. The researchers also found zircon crystals that likely formed from an impact no more than 22 million years ago.

Schmitt says that by applying the technique to rocks from Mars, the moon, asteroids and even Earth, scientists can learn about when volcanoes erupted in the distant past.

Source: sciencenews.org

A New Binding Site Involving the C-terminal Domain to Design Specific Inhibitors of PepX

One of our authors from our journal, Protein and Peptide Letters, discusses his outstanding research study in his article “A New Binding Site Involving the  C-terminal Domain  to Design Specific Inhibitors of PepX” in this podcast. He sheds light on the merits of his study and emphasizes the important points through diagrams and figures. This will prove useful to researchers and students of the field of protein and peptide research. Just click the link below and watch. Hope you like it!

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=483927455032889&set=vb.424355257656776&type=2&theater

 

Dark Chocolate and Blood Pressure: A Novel Study from Jordan

Coming Attractions:

Global Photo Associates(GPA) Japanese TV production company in Los Angeles presents:

Dark Chocolate and Blood Pressure: A Novel Study from Jordan Pp: 595 – 599
Saafan A. Al-Safi, Nehad M. Ayoub, Imad Al-Doghim and Faisal H. Aboul-Enein

TITLE: “Takeshi’s Health Entertainment:Home Medicine for
you”
(English translation)

AIR: ABC (Asahi Broadcasting Corporation)
TV station in Japan

AIR DATE: August 13th 2013 (possible reruns)
CONTENT: Educates audience on home medicine and
promotes healthy life.

Shows the study-cases of disease and illness, and how to prevent them, in educational and easy-to-understand way for the audience of all ages.

Stay tuned!

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