OPEN ACCESS ARTICLE – An Update on Anti-IgE Therapy in Pediatric Respiratory Diseases – Current Respiratory Medicine Reviews

Journal: Current Respiratory Medicine Reviews

Author(s): 

Graphical Abstract:

 

Abstract:

Anti-IgE treatment represents a major breakthrough in the therapeutic management of severe allergic asthma. Omalizumab is the unique biologic treatment registered for asthma therapy in children. The clinical efficacy and safety of omalizumab treatment in the pediatric population has been extensively documented in specific trials and consistently expanded from real-life studies. In addition, new experimental evidence suggests that omalizumab may also interfere with the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying airway remodeling. Novel investigational anti-IgE monoclonal antibodies with improved pharmacodynamic properties are in the pipeline, potentially offering alternative mechanisms of modulating IgE pathway.

The aim of this review is to update current knowledge on anti-IgE therapy in pediatric respiratory diseases.

Read more here: http://www.eurekaselect.com/153354

 

Article By Disease: Allergy

New Patents of Fixed Combinations of Nasal Antihistamines and Corticosteroids in Allergic Rhinitis

Author(s): Ole D. Wolthers

 

Abstract: During the last few years, fixed combinations of intranasal antihistamines and corticosteroids have been introduced for treatment of allergic rhinitis. The aim of this systematic review was to assess recent patents and clinical evidence for fixed combinations of intranasal antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids in allergic rhinitis. Data base searches revealed that intranasal combinations of the antihistamine azelastine with the corticosteroids mometasone furoate, ciclesonide and fluticasone propionate, respectively, have been patented. Four randomized, double-blinded, parallelgroup, placebo-controlled, multicenter trials sponsored by the manufacturer evaluated the fixed combination of intranasal azelastine 125µg and fluticasone propionate 50µg administered as one dose per nostril b.i.d. in patients with moderate-tosevere symptomatic allergic rhinitis ≥ 12 years of age. Three of the studies were published as a meta-analysis which found the fixed combination of azelastine and fluticasone propionate statistically significantly more efficacious in reducing baseline total nasal symptom score by 5.7 as compared to azelastine (4.4; P < 0.001), fluticasone propionate (5.1; P < 0.001) and placebo (3.0; P < 0.001). The findings were supported by secondary assessments of scores of specific nasal and ocular symptoms.

Download the complete article from here: http://www.eurekaselect.com/node/114548/article


 

This article is from the journal Recent Patents on Inflammation & Allergy Drug Discovery 

 

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