Most Cited Article – Indacaterol Acetate/Glycopyrronium Bromide/Mometasone Furoate: A Combination Therapy for Asthma

Author(s):Alberto Papi*Konstantinos KostikasIvan Nikolaev and Ioannis Kottakis

Volume 18, Issue 2, 2022

Published on: 24 March, 2022

Page: [77 – 85]

Pages: 9

DOI: 10.2174/1573398X18666220217151845

Abstract

Despite the wide range of available therapies, asthma remains uncontrolled in 40-65% of patients for a number of different reasons. Treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) is recommended in the Global Initiative for Asthma 2021 report for patients across all asthma severities, with treatment options combining an ICS with a long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) or a LABA and a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA), depending on disease severity. Based on this, the availability of a single inhaler fixed-dose ICS/LABA/LAMA combination is a major need in asthma management. Indacaterol acetate/glycopyrronium bromide/mometasone furoate has been developed as a once-daily inhaled asthma treatment that combines an ICS (mometasone furoate), a LABA (indacaterol acetate), and a LAMA (glycopyrronium bromide) in a formulation delivered using the dry powder inhaler Breezhaler®, for patients with uncontrolled asthma on medium- or high-dose ICS/LABA. This article provides an overview of the different and complementary mechanisms of action and the clinical effectiveness of the monocomponents of the indacaterol/glycopyrronium/ mometasone furoate fixed combination and highlights the benefits of using the three agents in combination in patients with moderate and severe asthma. Read now: https://bit.ly/3ffk29V

Most Cited Article – Susceptibility to Rhinovirus-induced Early Wheezing as a Risk Factor for Subsequent Asthma Development

Author(s):Hannele Mikkola*Minna HonkilaTerhi Tapiainen and Tuomas Jartti

Volume 18, Issue 2, 2022

Published on: 03 January, 2022

Page: [86 – 94]

Pages: 9

DOI: 10.2174/1573398X18666220103113813

Abstract

Rhinovirus is one of the two most common viral agents that cause bronchiolitis in young children. During the first 12 months, it is second to the respiratory syncytial virus, but after 12 months, it begins dominating the statistics. Wheezing and dry cough are typical clinical symptoms indicative of rhinovirus-induced bronchiolitis, although overlap of symptoms with other virus infections is common. Several studies have shown that atopic predisposition and reduced interferon responses increase susceptibility to rhinovirus-induced wheezing. More recent studies have found that certain genetic variations at strong asthma loci also increase susceptibility. Rhinovirus-induced wheezing in the early years of life is known to increase the risk of subsequent asthma development and may be associated with airway remodeling. This risk is increased by aeroallergen sensitization. Currently, there are no clinically approved preventive treatments for asthma. However, studies show promising results indicating that children with rhinovirus-affected first-time wheezing respond to bronchodilators in terms of less short-term symptoms and that controlling airway inflammatory responses with anti-inflammatory medication may markedly decrease asthma development. Also, enhancing resistance to respiratory viruses has been a topic of discussion. Primary and secondary prevention strategies are being developed with the aim of decreasing the incidence of asthma. Here, we review the current knowledge on rhinovirus-induced early wheezing as a risk factor for subsequent asthma development and related asthma-prevention strategies. Read now: https://bit.ly/3RXdhbr

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