Press Release | Diminished returns of educational attainment on heart disease among black Americans

 

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This article by Dr. Shervin Assari et al. is published in The Open Cardiovascular Medicine Journal, Volume 14, 2020

In a fair society, education is expected to be the great equalizer. This is based on the belief that education enabled people to escape poverty and join the middle class. In the United States, education is listed as a key strategy to achieve the American dream, even for people born to poor families. Education also protects individuals against heart disease. People’s risk of heart disease is lowest in the most and highest in the least educated people.

In the most recent issue of The Open Cardiovascular Medicine Journal, Assari and colleagues explored the racial and ethnic variation in the link between education and heart disease in a nationally representative sample of American adults. The authors analyzed data of 25,659 American adults who participated in the first wave of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH- 2013). They categorize individuals based on education to less than a high school diploma, high school graduate, and college graduate. Then they compared race/ethnicity by education groups for the prevalence of heart disease.

Individuals with highest education had the lowest prevalence of heart disease. However, this protective effect was weaker for Hispanic and Black than for non-Hispanic and White individuals. That means, highly educated Black and Hispanic people remained at high risk of heart disease.

This finding is an extension of the Marginalization related Diminished Returns (MDRs) which refer to the weaker health benefits of education for racial and ethnic minority groups compared to Whites. While we knew that highly educated Black and Hispanic Americans remain at risk of obesity, poor diet, depression, tobacco use, and sedentary lifestyle, this was the first study to document the same pattern for heart disease.

Possibly due to the racism and social stratification, in the US, education is not the great equalizer but a source of health inequalities. Read full Press Release to find out more: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-05/bsp-dro050620.php

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This article is open access and its full-text can be obtained from the following link: https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOCMJ-14-5

Press Release | Children & coronavirus infection (COVID-19): How to avoid post-traumatic stress disorder

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This editorial by Prof. Michele Roccella is published in The Open Pediatric Medicine Journal, Volume 10, 2020

 

COVID-19 is a pandemic that has forced many states to declare restrictive measures in order to prevent their wider spread. These measures are necessary to protect the health of adults, children and people with disabilities. Long quarantine periods could cause an increase in anxiety crisis, fear of contagion and post-traumatic stress disorder (frustration, boredom, isolation, fear, insomnia, difficulty concentrating).

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops as a consequence of one or more physical or psychological traumatic events, such as exposure to natural disasters such as earthquakes, fires, floods, hurricanes, tsunamis; wars, torture, death threats; road accidents, robbery, air accidents; diseases with unfavorable prognosis; complicated or traumatic mourning; physical and sexual abuse and abuse during childhood; victimization and discrimination based on gender, sexual orientation, gender identity. It can also develop following changes in lifestyle habits caused by the COCOVID-19 epidemic. The arrival of the pandemic caused by the Coronavirus (Covid-19) in the world is bringing families, teachers, educators and all the people who care for children every day. Long quarantine periods could cause an increase in anxiety crisis, fear of contagion and post-traumatic stress disorder (frustration, boredom, isolation, fear, insomnia, difficulty concentrating). It is important to speak calmly and directly to children.

The child may also be told that isolation is needed to avoid contact with the virus until we have effective drugs or a vaccine. For children, staying at home is not a problem, they are used to holidays; they spend their time playing, watching television, talking with family members, in some cases where the restrictive measures are not too strict, I can play outdoors. In these cases it is essential to reassure the children, to structure their day, to divide the times and spaces according to patterns and rhythms. We can say that based on previous quarantine experiences that long periods of isolation can lead to psychological symptoms such as emotional disturbances, depression, stress, mood disturbances, irritability, insomnia and signs of traumatic post-stress disorders. Therefore it is important to be able to explain to children what is happening and how to manage this traumatic event following the COVID-19 pandemic. Read full Press Release to find out more: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-05/bsp-cc050620.php

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This editorial can be obtained from the following link: https://benthamopen.com/ABSTRACT/TOPEDJ-10-1

New Podcast by Dr. Oriana Tabarrini

“From Small to Powerful: The Fragments Universe and its Chem-Appeal”:

 News release date: April 01, 2014

Bussum, Netherlands, April 1, 2014: A podcast by Dr. Oriana Tabarrini, based on his article “From Small to Powerful: The Fragments Universe and its Chem-Appeal”, published in Current Medicinal Chemistry Vol.20, No. 11, 2013 has been recently shared on Bentham Science’s YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PkU2EUDmX4&feature=youtu.be

For further details, please visit : Current Medicinal Chemistry.

Scopus indexes The Open Communication Journal

SciVerse Scopus accepts coverage of The Open Communication Journal (http://benthamscience.com/open/tocommj/index.htm) published by Bentham Science Publishers under the banner of “Bentham Open”. Scopus (http://www.scopus.com/home.url) is the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature and quality web sources with smart tools to track, analyze and visualize research. It is designed to help scientists to fulfill their informational needs.

Bentham Open is publishing over 240 peer-reviewed open access journals. These free-to-view online journals cover all major disciplines of science, technology, medicine, engineering, mathematics, chemistry, life sciences, pharmaceutical science, earth sciences, social sciences and environmental science. Published exclusively online, the journals are available for FREE viewing via Bentham OPEN’s website at www.benthamscience.com/open. Bentham Open aims to provide scientists, researchers, students and decision makers from academia and industry around the world with freely accessible peer-reviewed published articles.

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Open Communication Journal Indexed by Scopus
Open Communication Journal Indexed by Scopus
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