Health Benefits of Deep Breathing

When we are stressed, angry or anxious, we might experience rapid, shallow breathing, tightened muscles, and other negative symptoms. Not only do these unpleasant symptoms feel bad, they may also lead to heart problems, sleeplessness, increased blood pressure, infections and autoimmune diseases in the long run, if experienced repeatedly.

Breathe Deeply

Luckily, deep breathing can help you avoid these unpleasant symptoms and diseases. But what exactly does deep breathing do for you? Here’s a list:

  1. It relaxes your muscles

It is hard to maintain physical tension when breathing deeply.

  1. It improves oxygen delivery

When you are relaxed and breathing deeply, fresh oxygen is supplied to every cell in your body. This leads to better functionality of body organs, as well as enhanced mental focus and physical strength.

  1. It lowers blood pressure

As your muscles release tension as a result of deep breathing, your blood vessels expand and your blood pressure is normalized.

  1. It causes endorphins’ release

Deep breathing causes the release of endorphins, thus increasing the sensations of comfort and relieving pain.

  1. It detoxifies

Taking long and deep breaths helps improve lymphatic system function which boosts dangerous toxin release, thus cleansing the body and allowing it to focus its energy to more fruitful tasks.

So, breathe deeply and live more joyfully!

Stress and Heart!

Everyone feels stressed in different ways and their reaction to it varies from person to person. Stress can lead to many health problems. When stressed some people panic, smoke, drink and overact and react.  All of these lead to many heart diseases. Stress may enhance factors that can cause heart disease like cholesterol, high blood pressure etc. Stress can also cause back strain, stomach pains and headache. A new study also shows that people who experience higher level of stress also have increased inflammations in the arteries which can lead to many heart problems.

Distressed young manager man holds her head with hand

A new study was presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 65th Annual Scientific Session. In that study imaging was used to look at 293 people’s brain and arteries. Researchers revealed that stress activity in an area of the brain called the amygdala, which is where emotions are processed, was linked to increased inflammation in a person’s arteries. It was noted that 35% of the people who experienced high stress suffered a heart event.

There are many techniques which can help a person to cope with stress. For instance, balanced diet and regular physical activity like yoga can help a person to relax, and stay happy and calm.

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