Editors Choice Article | Small Animal Models for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B, and Tuberculosis: Proceedings of an NIAID Workshop

Journal Name: Current HIV Research

Author(s): Ramesh Akkina, Daniel L. Barber, Moses T. Bility, Karl-Dimiter Bissig, Benjamin J. Burwitz, Katrin Eichelberg, Janice J. Endsley, J. Victor Garcia, Richard Hafner, Petros C. Karakousis, Brent E. Korba, Rajen Koshy, Chris Lambros, Stephan Menne, Eric L. Nuermberger, Alexander Ploss, Brendan K. Podell, Larisa Y. Poluektova, Brigitte E. Sanders-Beer*, Selvakumar Subbian, Angela Wahl.

 

 

 

Graphical Abstract:

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Abstract:

The main advantage of animal models of infectious diseases over in vitro studies is the gain in the understanding of the complex dynamics between the immune system and the pathogen. While small animal models have practical advantages over large animal models, it is crucial to be aware of their limitations. Although the small animal model at least needs to be susceptible to the pathogen under study to obtain meaningful data, key elements of pathogenesis should also be reflected when compared to humans. Welldesigned small animal models for HIV, hepatitis viruses and tuberculosis require, additionally, a thorough understanding of the similarities and differences in the immune responses between humans and small animals and should incorporate that knowledge into the goals of the study. To discuss these considerations, the NIAID hosted a workshop on ‘Small Animal Models for HIV, Hepatitis B, and Tuberculosis’ on May 30, 2019. Highlights of the workshop are outlined below.

 

To read out more, please visit: http://www.eurekaselect.com/177698/article

High Protein Intake Aggravates HIV

Today, 1st of December, is observed as World Aids Day to support the people suffering with AIDS caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). For the last few decades there has been great attention given to HIV/AIDS with focus on its occurrence, causes, growth, harmfulness and possible preventions and cure. Researchers around the world have joined arms to fight and eradicate this deadly disease.

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Studies have also shown that diet also has considerable impact on AIDS patients. Recent research done by Dr. Evgeny Vlad. Butorov from Municipal Center of HIV/AIDS prophylaxis, Surgut, Russian Federation, has shown that high intake of protein can aggravate things for the patients. The study was conducted on HIV-infected patients to assess how the dietary protein can help or hamper their conditions. Protein enhanced the growth of the virus, suppresses the human immune system and allows other viruses and bacteria to attack the patients. The study opens doors for further research on the impact of diet and also the development of treatments for this dangerous disease.

This study is published in Current HIV Research in the article, Impact of High Protein Intake on Viral Load and Hematological Parameters in HIV-infected Patients.

“Approaches to Minimize Infection Risk in Blood Banking and Transfusion Practice”

On World Blood Donor Day 2016, here is an Open Access Article from the journal Infectious Disorders – Drug Targets

Author(s): Paul F. Lindholm, Kyle Annen and Glenn Ramsey

iddtAbstract: The use of blood donor history and state-of-the-art FDA-licensed serological and nucleic acid testing (NAT) assays have greatly reduced the “infectious window” for several transfusion-transmitted pathogens. Currently transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV), hepatitis viruses and West Nile Virus are rare events. The seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus in the donor population is high and cytomegalovirus infection can cause significant complications for immunocompromised recipients of blood transfusion. Careful use of CMV seronegative blood resources and leukoreduction of blood products are able to prevent most CMV infections in these patients. Currently, bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates is the greatest remaining infectious disease risk in blood transfusion.

Read more about it here: http://benthamscience.com/journals/infectious-disorders-drug-targets/volume/11/issue/1/page/45/

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