Article by Disease – “Brain Aging and Disorders of the Central Nervous System: Kynurenines and Drug Metabolism”

Article by Disease on “Metabolic Disorders”

Abstract:

Introduction: The kynurenine pathway includes several neuroactive compounds, including kynurenic acid, picolinic acid, 3-hydroxykynurenine and quinolinic acid. The enzymatic cascade of the kynurenine pathway is tightly connected with the immune system, and may provide a link between the immune system and neurotransmission.

Main Areas Covered: Alterations in this cascade are associated with neurodegenerative, neurocognitive, autoimmune and psychiatric disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, migraine or schizophrenia.

Highlights: This review highlights the alterations in this metabolic pathway in the physiological aging process and in different disorders. A survey is also presented of therapeutic possibilities of influencing this metabolic route, which can be achieved through the use of synthetic kynurenic acid analogues, enzyme inhibitors or even nanotechnology.

Read more: http://www.eurekaselect.com/node/138027/article 

Article by Disease – “FoxO1 Inhibitors: The Future Medicine for Metabolic Disorders?”

Article by Disease on “Metabolism”

Abstract:

FoxO1, one of the most widely expressed sub-families of the winged helix forkhead factors, is biologically ‘omni-functional’ owing to its far-flung roles in metabolism, cell cycle, tissue differentiation and development and oxidative stress response. The knowledge of involvement of FoxO1 in metabolic disorders has long been there, but the potential target remained underutilized due to unavailability of specific and potent inhibitors. The review provides an insight into the role of FoxO1 in orchestrating metabolic diseases’ pathogenesis (including diabetes, its secondary complications and obesity) and compiles the literature on FoxO1 inhibitors. The emergence of various natural molecules and synthesized small molecules like AS1842856 as FoxO1 inhibitors urges us to think further and decide the future course of drug development for the management of metabolic disorders.

Read more: http://benthamscience.com/journals/current-diabetes-reviews/volume/12/issue/3/page/223/

Article By Disease: Metabolism

‘Repurposed Drugs in Metabolic Disorders’

Author(s): Josef Finsterer and Marlies Frank

Abstract: Drug repurposing (drug repositioning, drug reprofiling, drug retasking) gains increasing importance as the development of new drugs becomes increasingly expensive. Though only a few compounds have been approved for new indications in the field of metabolic disorders, there are a number of substances which have the potential to become reprofiled in a new indication. Generally, reprofiled drugs for metabolic disorders can be classified in three groups. Group A contains those of which both, the original and repurposed indication, concern metabolic disorders. Group B comprises drugs, which were originally approved for non-metabolic disorders but show beneficial effects for metabolic disorders after repurposing..

Download the complete article from here: http://www.eurekaselect.com/node/115624/article


This article is from the journal Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

 

%d bloggers like this: