Editors Choice Article | Advanced High-Coverage Targeted Metabolomics Method (SWATHtoMRM) for Exploring the Relationship of Follicular Fluid Componen ts with Age

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Journal Name: Current Pharmaceutical Analysis

Author(s): Jingyan Song, Tianqi Wang, Jiayin Guo, Ying Guo, Xiaoming Wang, Yi Yang, Kaiyue Xu, Yuanhong Sa, Lihua Yuan, Huaying Jiang, Zhengao Sun*.

 

Abstract:

Background: The complexity of follicular fluid metabolome presents a huge challenge for qualitative and quantitative metabolite profiling and discovery of the comprehensive biomarkers.

Objective: In order to address this challenge, novel SWATHtoMRM metabolomics method was used for providing broad coverage and excellent quantitative capability to discover the human follicular fluid metabolites related to age and evaluate their relationship with pregnancy outcome and oocyte senescence.

Methods: The patients were divided into four groups according to age, including group A (28 cases, 21- 27 years old), group B (42 cases, 28-34 years old), group C (31 cases, 35-41 years old), and group D (24 cases, 42-48 years old). Follicular fluid samples from 125 IVF patients were analyzed. The differential ions among the four groups were identified by principal components analysis according to accurate mass, isotope ratio, and tandem mass spectroscopic spectra. Then, the differential metabolic pathways were further identified by a KEGG cluster analysis.

Results: A total of 18 metabolites in the follicular fluid differed among the four groups, including amino acids, lipids, hormones, and vitamins. A total of 15 metabolites, including 6-oxohexanoate, phenylalanine, proline, hexadecanoic acid, linoleate, arachidonate, oleic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, LysoPC(16:1), LysoPC(20:5), LysoPC (20:3), 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, 5-dehydroepisterol, 27- hydroxycholesterol, and 5beta-cholestane-3alpha,7alpha,12alpha,23,25-pentol, were down-regulated with age and 3 metabolites, including LysoPC(18:3), LysoPC(18:1), and 13,14-dihydroretinol, were upregulated with age.

Conclusion: Our study provides useful information for revealing the relationship between age and female reproductive capability.

 

 

 

To read out more, please visit: http://www.eurekaselect.com/170068/article

 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS | Thematic Issue for Current Alzheimer Research

Journal: Current Alzheimer Research

Guest Editor(s): Keshen Li
Tentative Publication Date: July, 2019

 

Systems Genetics of Alzheimer’s disease: From GWAS to
Disease Pathways

 

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common dementia and neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. AD is highly heritable and complex. In recent years, genetic studies especially genomewide association studies (GWAS) and next-generation sequencing have identified several AD risk variants and pathways associated with the potential pathogenesis and genetic mechanisms of AD. Until now, more than 20 risk loci that affect AD have been identified. These loci are estimated to explain about 28% of the heritability of liability, 30% of familial risk, and over 50% of sibling recurrence risk of developing AD. Despite these successes, the majority of genetic risk remains to be further identified. The identification of the causative variants or mutations remains challenging and the molecular mechanisms are still rarely characterized. In the post-genome era, the major challenge is to mine novel disease risks from multi-level omics data using system biology methods, which may expand our knowledge of the causes of AD. Therefore, we propose a Special Issue of the topic ‘Systems genetics of Alzheimer’s disease: From GWAS to disease
pathways’. This special issue will focus on the mechanism of genesis and development of AD, as well as valuable clues for the development of novel therapeutic approaches of AD. We believe the systems genetics will help us move from disease risk loci to disease aetiology. This Special Issue welcomes reviews and original papers covering recent genetic research on AD using system biology methods. For more details please visit: https://bit.ly/2M2i6mo

 

Email here to submit your paper: hermain@benthamscience.net

                                                          CC: faizan@benthamscience.net

CURRENT ALZHEIMER RESEARCH

CALL FOR PAPERS | Thematic Issue for Current Medicinal Chemistry

Journal: Current Alzheimer Research

Guest Editor(s): Keshen Li
Tentative Publication Date: July, 2019

 

Systems Genetics of Alzheimer’s disease: From GWAS to
Disease Pathways

 

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common dementia and neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. AD is highly heritable and complex. In recent years, genetic studies especially genomewide association studies (GWAS) and next-generation sequencing have identified several AD risk variants and pathways associated with the potential pathogenesis and genetic mechanisms of AD. Until now, more than 20 risk loci that affect AD have been identified. These loci are estimated to explain about 28% of the heritability of liability, 30% of familial risk, and over 50% of sibling recurrence risk of developing AD. Despite these successes, the majority of genetic risk remains to be further identified. The identification of the causative variants or mutations remains challenging and the molecular mechanisms are still rarely characterized. In the post-genome era, the major challenge is to mine novel disease risks from multi-level omics data using system biology methods, which may expand our knowledge of the causes of AD. Therefore, we propose a Special Issue of the topic ‘Systems genetics of Alzheimer’s disease: From GWAS to disease
pathways’. This special issue will focus on the mechanism of genesis and development of AD, as well as valuable clues for the development of novel therapeutic approaches of AD. We believe the systems genetics will help us move from disease risk loci to disease aetiology. This Special Issue welcomes reviews and original papers covering recent genetic research on AD using system biology methods. For more details please visit: https://bit.ly/2M2i6mo

Email here to submit your paper: hermain@benthamscience.net

                                                          CC: faizan@benthamscience.net

CURRENT ALZHEIMER RESEARCH

Press Release | Novel Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases

 

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are proven to be the leading cause of deaths throughout the world. If statistics are reviewed, almost four out of five deaths are due to myocardial infarction or stroke. Efforts to prevent CVD have little effect on the decrease of the number of CVD related deaths despite many medical advances. Therefore, the search for new and even better therapies and treatments for the betterment of those who are suffering from CVD is still in progress. The field of metabolomics has offered a good solution for these diseases. Metabolomic biomarkers help clinicians to identify the risk of CVD and take preventive measures before the diseases can surface. Early diagnosis of CVD is a good sign for a patient’s recovery and also for their health. Therefore, there is a need to establish reliable, sensitive and non-invasive biomarkers which can serve as therapeutic targets for prevention and treatment of CVD.

In this study, analytical techniques are discussed along with the workflow that is used in untargeted metabolomics. Case studies that highlight the use of untargeted metabolomics in CVD research are also identified. Five of the case studies show approaches to identify untargeted metabolomics and apply this information in clinical situations. Analysis was conducted for the prediction of cardiovascular disease risk, myocardial ischemia, transient ischemic attack, incident coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction risk. The use of the untargeted metabolomics for risk assessment is still relatively new and there is still a need for future advancements in metabolomics technologies. Read full press release to find out more at: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-12/bsp-nb122518.php

 

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The article by Dr. Geoff H. Werstuck et al. is published in Cardiovascular & Hematological Disorders-Drug Targets, Volume 18, Issue 3, 2018. To obtain this article, please visit: http://www.eurekaselect.com/161468

EDITOR’S CHOICE – Advances in Anti-Doping Analytical Approaches – Current Pharmaceutical Analysis

Journal: Current Pharmaceutical Analysis

Author(s): Xianchi Li, Peiying Zhang*

Graphical Abstract:

 

Abstract:

Background: Performance enhancement substances and methods other than exercise training and physical conditioning have become a major problem in athletic competitions. Over the last few years, there has been an increase in the number of these doping approaches used by some athletes, including pharmaceuticals, slightly modified endogenous compounds and also blood transfusions. In order to control and prevent these doping practices by athletes, World Anti-Doping Agency has stipulated several guidelines and approved various methods on the basis of reproducibility, sensitivity and adaptability. The number, design and type of doping substances are increasing on daily basis necessitating the rapid development of analytical methods to detect these substances and to prevent doping.

Objective: In this review, we address the various methodological developments in the last few years to track down the novel doping substances as well as doping methods.

Results: There have been significant advances in the area of mass spectroscopy and the associated detection devices to measure small quantities of test substance or their metabolites in body tissues and fluids. Some of the doping substances have short biological half-life but leave imprints of their action in the form of altered gene expression, protein expression or metabolism, which can be detected by OMICs technologies.

Conclusion: The rapid advance in biological instrumentation and our understanding of the molecular basis of the actions of doping substances have paved the way to enforce ‘true play’ in athletic competitions. But this is an incessant and a continuous process as long as the doping practices continue.

Read more here: http://www.eurekaselect.com/151469/article

 

 

PRESS RELEASE – Metabolomics, a promising tool for advancing in treatment personalization of oncological patients

This article by Dr. Leonor Puchades-Carrasco and Dr. Antonio Pineda- Lucena is published in Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, Volume 17 , Issue 24 , 2017

Graphical Abstract:

 

Metabolomics, the analysis of the complete set of metabolites in a defined biological compartment, is a relatively novel approach. Metabolomics studies have been successfully applied to get a better understanding of many diseases, including a number of neoplastic processes. In this context, it is important to underline that cancer patients exhibit metabolic profiles that are different from those of healthy individuals and patients with benign diseases. Moreover, the site, the stage, and the location of the tumors have been shown to further alter the metabolic composition.

Currently, tumors are defined not only by their location but also by their molecular characteristics. The identification of specific mutations in tumors has started to play a critical role when determining therapeutic treatments. However, that information is not currently available for the majority of cancers, and the existing biomarkers are far from being optimal. Furthermore, there is considerable heterogeneity within the current definitions of pathological process, exemplified by the fact that patients who are given an identical diagnosis react differently to the same therapy and have different outcomes. In this context, metabolomics, in combination with other “omics” approaches, could contribute to get a deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying pathological processes, thus facilitating the classification of patients and their therapeutic treatment.

Precision medicine promises to tailor therapies for each individual by delivering more effective drug treatments, while avoiding or reducing adverse drug reactions. Towards this end, considerable efforts have been made over the last few years in the field of pharmacogenomics, with a focus on genotyping and identifying specific genetic variations associated with drug response. However, clinical pharmacology would benefit from the introduction of new methodologies capable of providing information that could complement this genomic information. This is necessary because drug metabolism and utilization involves many different enzymes, multiple organs, several compartments and even the microbiome, being not always possible to screen for all possible genetic or tissue variants. Furthermore, because drug metabolism varies with ethnicity, age, gender, weight, height and diet – as well as other environmental and physiological variables – it can be particularly challenging to predict how an individual will respond to a drug based on their genotype alone.

In this context, the ability to directly and accurately assess the biological phenotype of patients will be a critical component in determining the correct drug treatment or in predicting the response following a therapeutic treatment. Metabolites are the final products of cellular regulatory processes and their levels can be regarded as the ultimate response of biological systems to genetic and environmental changes. Similarly, to the terms ‘transcriptome’ or ‘proteome’, the set of metabolites synthetized by a biological system constitutes its ‘metabolome’. Since the metabolome is closely tied to the genotype of an individual as well as its physiology and the surrounding environment, metabolomics offers a unique opportunity to look at genotype-phenotype and genotype-environment relationships. Metabolomics is closely linked to the overall physiopathological status of an individual. Thus, metabolomics may incorporate the biochemical events of thousands of small molecules in cells, tissues, organs, or biological fluids. Disease state or drug exposure could alter such metabolite composition in qualitative and quantitative terms generating complex metabolic signatures. The analysis of these signatures can potentially provide useful information for the diagnosis and prognosis of patients as well as for predicting pharmacological responses to specific interventions. Additionally, specific metabolic signatures occur after drug treatment, thus providing information from pathways targeted or affected by drug therapy.

This review provides specific examples of metabolomics applications in the field of clinical pharmacology and precision medicine with a focus on the therapeutic management of cancer and in the translation of these results to the clinics.

OPEN ACCESS ARTICLE – Metabolomics Applications in Precision Medicine: An Oncological Perspective – Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

Journal: Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

Author(s): Leonor Puchades-Carrasco, Antonio Pineda- Lucena

Graphical Abstract:

Abstract:

Nowadays, cancer therapy remains limited by the conventional one-size-fits-all approach. In this context, treatment decisions are based on the clinical stage of disease but fail to ascertain the individual ´s underlying biology and its role in driving malignancy. The identification of better therapies for cancer treatment is thus limited by the lack of sufficient data regarding the characterization of specific biochemical signatures associated with each particular cancer patient or group of patients. Metabolomics approaches promise a better understanding of cancer, a disease characterized by significant alterations in bioenergetic metabolism, by identifying changes in the pattern of metabolite expression in addition to changes in the concentration of individual metabolites as well as alterations in biochemical pathways. These approaches hold the potential of identifying novel biomarkers with different clinical applications, including the development of more specific diagnostic methods based on the characterization of metabolic subtypes, the monitoring of currently used cancer therapeutics to evaluate the response and the prognostic outcome with a given therapy, and the evaluation of the mechanisms involved in disease relapse and drug resistance. This review discusses metabolomics applications in different oncological processes underlining the potential of this omics approach to further advance the implementation of precision medicine in the oncology area.

 

Read more here: http://www.eurekaselect.com/153940

 

 

Upcoming Thematic Issue – Advanced Techniques in metabolomics based early disease diagnostics

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http://benthamscience.com/journals/current-metabolomics/

Recently Published Issue of the Journal Current Metabolomics

Current Metabolomics publishes timely reviews, original research articles, thematic issues, and technical notes covering all aspects of the recent advancements and applications of “metabolomics technology to systems biology, disease diagnosis, personalized medicine, drug discovery, toxicity, nutrition and food, environmental studies, and functional genomics”.

Current Metabolomics Volume 2, Issue Number 2, 2014 has been published. Following are the articles from the recent issue:

“Transformation of UPLC-MS Data Overcomes Extreme Variability in Urine Concentration and Metabolite Fold Change”
By Dr. Brian Bothner

“H NMR-Linked Urinary Metabolic Profiling of Niemann-Pick Class C1 (NPC1) Disease: Identification of Potential New Biomarkers using Correlated Component Regression (CCR) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) Analysis Strategies”
By Dr. Martin Grootveld

“Metabolic Imaging through Continuous In Situ Micro-extractions of Tissue Samples via Flowprobe Mass Spectrometry”
by Dr. Mariam S. ElNaggar

“Clase Lipidomic Analysis of Glioblastoma Multiforme Using Mass Spectrometry”
by Dr. Kari L.

“The Regulation of Brain Nucleoside Utilization”
By Dr. Piero L. Ipata

“NMR-Metabolomics Study on Falcons Affected by Aspergillosis”
By Dr. Lucia Pappalardo

 

For details, please visit: http://bit.ly/1wclF9k

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