Testimonial By Dr. Bo-Shen Gong

Read what our Authors have to say about publishing in our Journal

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Journal Name: Current Cancer Drug Targets

Contributed Article: Nanotherapy Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment

Press Release | Current and Future Developments in Food Science: A new book series

 

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Food science is a growing field; Bentham’s new series starts off with a volume about chemical testing in foods

BENTHAM SCIENCE PUBLISHERS

Advances in the Determination of Xenobiotics in Foods is the first volume of the new book series, Current and Future Developments in Food Science. This inaugural volume explains recent developments in the field of xenobiotic determination in food. Readers are introduced to xenobiotic testing techniques through extensive reviews. Chapters also cover details about contaminants coming from food contact materials (such as plasticizers, food additives, polymer monomers/oligomers and non-intentionally added substances), substances used for food processing and sensing (nanoparticles), and residues of pesticides (that can also be present in the final food product). The book also includes information about specific xenobiotics that, due to their global distribution in the environment, are also likely to enter the food chain. Some of them are regulated (persistent organic pollutants and heavy metals) but there are many other types of contaminants (halogenated flame-retardants, perfluorinated compounds and micro- and nanoplastics) that must also be controlled. In addition, some xenobiotics could be present in the final food consumed because of food treatments (acrylamide, furan, heterocyclic aromatic amines, and glycidol esters). Finally, the concluding chapters of the book are devoted to the presence of natural contaminants such as mycotoxins and biogenic amines.

The combination of extensive information of analytical techniques for xenobiotics along with a categorical treatment of food contaminants makes this volume a useful reference for food science and technology students and technicians involved in food safety and processing management roles.

About The Editors:

Belen Gomara is a tenured scientist at the Department of Instrumental Analysis and Environmental Chemistry of the Institute of Organic Chemistry (IQOG) of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) in Madrid (Spain). Her research career is focused in the areas of Analytical Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry and Food Safety. She is an expert on the development and validation of analytical methodologies for the determination of legislated and emerging-non-legislated persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Her current scientific activity also involves the development of methodologies for the determination of contaminants related to food packaging, such as phthalates and bisphenols.

Maria Luisa Marina is Full Professor of Analytical Chemistry at the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Alcalá (Madrid, Spain). Her research activity is focused on the development of innovative analytical methodologies using capillary chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques for the determination of compounds of interest in the pharmaceutical, environmental and food analysis (including the enantiomeric separation of chiral compounds, the search for biomarkers using metabolomics strategies and the determination of proteins, peptides and amino acids with important applications to the control of the quality and safety of foods and the revalorization of food residues).

 

Find out more about the book here: https://benthambooks.com/book/9789811421587/

Read full press release to find out more at: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-11/bsp-caf110719.php

Editors Choice Article | Crossing the Blood-Brain Barrier: A Review on Drug Delivery Strategies for Treatment of the Central Nervous System Diseases

Journal Name: Current Drug Delivery

Author(s): Nur Izzati Mansor, Norshariza Nordin*, Farahidah Mohamed, King Hwa Ling, Rozita Rosli, Zurina Hassan.

 

 

 

Graphical Abstract:

 

Abstract:

Many drugs have been designed to treat diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), especially neurodegenerative diseases. However, the presence of tight junctions at the blood-brain barrier has often compromised the efficiency of drug delivery to target sites in the brain. The principles of drug delivery systems across the blood-brain barrier are dependent on substrate-specific (i.e. protein transport and transcytosis) and non-specific (i.e. transcellular and paracellular) transport pathways, which are crucial factors in attempts to design efficient drug delivery strategies. This review describes how the blood-brain barrier presents the main challenge in delivering drugs to treat brain diseases and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of ongoing neurotherapeutic delivery strategies in overcoming this limitation. In addition, we discuss the application of colloidal carrier systems, particularly nanoparticles, as potential tools for therapy for the CNS diseases. To read out more, please visit: http://www.eurekaselect.com/174513/article

Publish your Medical Research for FREE | Current Nutraceuticals

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CALL FOR PAPERS!

Publish your Medical Research for FREE in our journal CURRENT NUTRACEUTICALS

All articles published in the first year would be free!

Submission Deadline: December 31st, 2019

To submit your paper, email at: hermain@benthamscience.net and CC: faizan@benthamscience.net

 

 

EDITOR’S CHOICE – Targeted Drug Delivery Systems and Their Therapeutic Applications in Cancer and Immune Pathological Conditions – Infectious Disorders – Drug Targets

Journal: Infectious Disorders – Drug Targets

Author(s): Jamshed Iqbal*, Fareeha Anwar, Saifullah Afridi*

Graphical Abstract:

 

Abstract:

Background: More than a century ago, Paul Ehrlich proposed the idea of a drug working as a “magic bullet” that selectively eliminates diseased cells without harming the surrounding normal cells. Since then, much progress has been made in this field to broaden the scope for targeted delivery of drugs. A major problem remain the toxic effects of targeted drugs on healthy cells. In order to reduce the adverse effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues, we survey the use of recent drug delivery systems for targeted therapy.

Objective: The selective delivery of the drugs to specific diseased cells or tissues still is a daunting task. Ideally, for target drug delivery systems, the system should be made up of carriers and drugs, where carriers precisely target the desired drug. This issue covers the recent advancements in modern techniques for such purposes.

Result and Conclusion: It encompasses advances, benefits and limitations in state of art work of targeted drug delivery through hydrogels, microfluidics, nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, polymeric micelles, liposomes, lipoprotein based drug carriers and dendrites.

 

MOST ACCESSED ARTICLE – Targeted Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease – Current Pharmaceutical Design

Journal: Current Pharmaceutical Design

Author(s): Rafael Martín-Rapun, Laura De Matteis, Alfredo Ambrosone, Sonia Garcia-Embid, Lucia Gutierrez, Jesus M. de la Fuente

Abstract:

Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has a dramatic impact on society. The therapeutic targets are located in the central nervous system (CNS), which limits the efficacy of drugs systemically administered: the blood-brain barrier (BBB) selectively allows the permeation of just a few kinds of molecules from the systemic circulation to the CNS. On the other hand, local administration routes to CNS are highly invasive.

Methods: In this article, we have reviewed therapeutic approaches against AD, which are based on nanoparticles targeted to the brain and to the pathological hallmarks of the disease. The existing literature has been classified according to the AD feature that is addressed.

Results: Nanoparticles have been used for the targeted delivery of drugs aiming to reduce the AD symptoms or to reverse the course of the disease. For this task the multivalency of nanoparticles has allowed their functionalization with several kinds of targeting groups, to cross the BBB and to target the place of treatment. With this approach an increased drug bioavailability has been achieved in the CNS using intravenous administration in place of more invasive administration routes. Additionally, nanoparticles have also been used in the development of vaccines and therapeutic formulations for intranasal administration.
Conclusion: Targeted nanoparticles have been proved useful to enhance the performance of therapies against AD in animal models. A better understanding of AD mechanisms will help the successful application of targeted nanoparticles for combined therapies.

To access the article, please visit: http://www.eurekaselect.com/148709

Upcoming Thematic Issue – Advanced Functional Biointerfaces Engineering for Medical Applications – Current Medicinal Chemistry

CMC-THEMATIC FLYER -Valentina Dinca

http://benthamscience.com/journals/current-medicinal-chemistry/special-issues/

Most Accessed Article – Nanosized Drug Delivery Systems for Direct Nose to Brain Targeting – Recent Patents on Drug Delivery & Formulation

Journal: Recent Patents on Drug Delivery & Formulation

Author(s): Kunjan Phukan, Marika Nandy, Rupanjali B. Sharma, Hemanta K. Sharma.

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Abstract:

Background: Drug targeting to brain has always been problematic due to Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB), which, does not allow most of the drugs to pass through it as they are hydrophilic and macromolecular drugs. So, in order to bypass the BBB, alternative modes of administration were searched and nasal to brain delivery route was tried by many workers. Such studies yielded patented nano-formulations with the ability to cross blood brain barrier.

Methods: Nanoparticles being smaller in size and large surface area help in increasing the rate of drug permeation to the brain. In this review work, emphasis has been laid on discussion on various works done in the field of nasal delivery of drugs to brain over the last decade.

Results: The works that are discussed in this paper show better drug targeting of brain when given through nasal route as nanoparticles. Experiments performed in animal models have clearly exhibited that nano-sized formulations are able to facilitate the delivery of drugs to brain through nose in comparison to tantamount drug solutions.

Conclusion: However, it is not yet confirmed whether the drug is freed from the formulation in the nasal cavity and then absorbed or the nanoparticles themselves are absorbed and then the drug is released in the CNS. Furthermore, the toxicity studies were not carried out extensively in suitably designed model, which should be considered before going for further studies and application.

To access the article, please visit: http://www.eurekaselect.com/140558

Podcast: Potential Biomolecules and Current Treatment Technologies for Diabetic Foot Ulcer

Author(s):  Zenith Khashim, Shila Samuel, Nallusamy Duraisamy, Kathiravan Krishnan.

For article details, visit: http://www.eurekaselect.com/152589/article

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Current Nanomaterials, Volume 1 – Number 1

“Recent Developments in the Green Syntheses of Chalcogenide Based Semi-conductor Nanoparticles”

Abstract:

Method: In this review, an attempt has been made to survey the recent work of green syntheses on metal-chalcogenide nanoparticles by different routes. The aqueous approach is an advantageous alternative to the conventionally used organometallic route, mainly due to its scalability, environmental friendliness, cost effectiveness and more importantly, the biocompatibility.

Read more here: http://benthamscience.com/journals/current-nanomaterials/volume/1/issue/1/page/12/

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