New From Bentham Science: ‘Coronaviruses’

Bentham Science is happy to announce an important new journal, Coronaviruses. It will focus specifically on the latest research on the various coronavirus strains, recent COVID-19 outbreak, and the emerging methods employed to treat coronavirus infections and prevent future outbreaks.

During these difficult times, it is more important than ever to support the scientists working around the clock to understand, treat, and prevent coronavirus outbreaks. Every day, new discoveries are made in different corners of the world. Virologists, epidemiologists, microbiologists, immunologists, doctors, and many other scientists and medical professionals are still learning about this virus. They are trying to determine just how the coronavirus spreads, how it mutates between different hosts, and what symptoms it causes. These scientists are also working to discover effective treatments and to potentially develop a vaccine that could help prevent a future outbreak.

Bentham Science knows that having access to cutting-edge, up-to-date information on coronavirus is essential to people around the world. Scientific research is informing government policies and responses to the outbreak around the world, and it is important to make those decisions with the most accurate information available. With that in mind, every article in the first issue of the journal will be published as open access, meaning it will be free to download for the first three months after its publication.

Coronaviruses will publish original research articles, letters, reviews/mini-reviews, and guest-edited thematic issues on all aspects of coronaviruses, including (but not limited to) their origins, types, transmission, pathogenesis, epidemiological, demographic, clinical, and genomic characteristics. The journal will also cover case reports and studies on outbreak of coronaviruses, their symptoms, related diseases, prevention, treatment regimens, and development of new drugs.

We are proud to name Dr. Di Liu as the Editor-in-Chief of the new Coronaviruses journal. Dr. Di Liu is a Principal Investigator at the Wuhan Institute of Virology, a world-renowned institution on virus research doing work at the heart of the current outbreak. His research focuses are microbial genomic and meta-genomic analyses and bioinformatics analyses on pathogenic microbes.

The Honorary Editors of the journal are Dr. Ferid Murad, a Nobel prize winning physician and pharmacologist, and Professor Atta-Ur-Rahman, FRS, an award-winning chemist from Karachi University.

This new journal will be essential reading for virologists, epidemiologists, microbiologists, healthcare workers, and scientists of all kinds interested in the latest information about coronaviridae.

For more information about Bentham Science, please visit their website.

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World Polio Day, 2018!

 

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World Polio Day was established by Rotary International over a decade ago to commemorate the birth of Jonas Salk, who led the first team to develop a vaccine against poliomyelitis. Use of this inactivated poliovirus vaccine and subsequent widespread use of the oral poliovirus, developed by Albert Sabin, led to the establishment of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in 1988. As of 2013, GPEI had reduced polio worldwide by 99%.

Polio is a crippling and potentially fatal infectious disease. There is no cure, but there are safe and effective vaccines. Polio can be prevented through immunization. Polio vaccine, given multiple times, almost always protects a child for life. The strategy to eradicate polio is therefore based on preventing infection by immunizing every child until transmission stops and the world is polio-free.

 

Bentham Science publishes articles related to World Polio Day in its Subscription based journals including:

 

 

TO AVAIL 20% DISCOUNT ON RELATED EBOOKS, KINDLY VISIT: HTTPS://EBOOKS.BENTHAMSCIENCE.COM/

 

 

 

Press Release for EurekAlert! Bacterial outer membrane vesicles: An emerging tool in vaccine development

This article by Kendrick B. Turner and Scott A. Walper is published in Drug Delivery Letters, Volume 7, Issue 2, 2017

Graphical Abstract:

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Outer membrane vesicles, biological nanoparticles shed during normal growth by bacteria, have seen significant recent advances in engineering and are thus finding new utility as therapeutic and drug delivery agents. One specific research focus explored recently in the literature is the use of bacterial vesicles as adjuvants in vaccine formulations. Early success in this area has demonstrated protection against infection by a number of bacterial species in animal models by engineering vesicles to display species-specific antigens as cargo, either within the interior of the vesicles or displayed on the exterior vesicle surface. In an effort to highlight recent advances in this field, this article explores recent and ongoing efforts to develop novel engineering methods aimed at providing new functionalities for bacterial vesicles as they apply to vaccine formulations. Specifically emerging technologies for engineering these structures, including cargo loading and surface modification will be explored. Bacterial vesicles show great promise as biologically-, derived nanoparticles that could function as a platform technology in a variety of fields. With continued development of novel engineering tools, and an increased understanding in their biogenesis and biological fate in living systems there is significant potential to develop bacterial vesicles as tools for not only vaccine development but also for use in the delivery of therapeutic compounds to targeted cells.

For More information about the article, please visit: http://www.eurekaselect.com/154475

For Press Release on EurekAlert, please visit: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-09/bsp-bom092617.php

Stay Protected!!

immunization infographics

Podcast Broadcast!

A Brand New #Podcast! Click on! 
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Title: The Recent Progress in RSV Vaccine Technology
Journal: Recent Patents on Anti-Infective Drug Discovery
Author: Doxa Kotzia
Vol.7, No.3, 2012

Abstract:

The most effective way to control RSV infection would be the development of an expedient and safe vaccine. Subunit vaccines, live attenuated RSV vaccines, plasmid DNA vaccines have been tested either in human or in mouse models without reaching the ultimate goal of efficacy and safety, at least in humans. Viruses such as adenovirus, sendai virus, measles virus were also used as vectors for the generation of RSV vaccines with promising results in animal models. Recent patents describe new techniques for the generation of candidate vaccines. These patents include virus like particles as vaccine platforms, recombinant RSVs or modified RSV F protein as component of the vaccine. Despite the number of the candidate vaccines, the new RSV vaccines should overcome many obstacles before being established as effective vaccines for the control of RSV infections especially for the young infants who are more susceptible to the virus.

For more information on the article: http://eurekaselect.com/103971/article

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